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MSNBC Mastermind Phil Griffin

February 19, 2014 — MSNBC President Phil Griffin has been enormously successful in creating an identity for his cable news network, which reaches more than 100 million American households. He orchestrated the launch of many successful programs, including “Morning Joe,” “The Rachel Maddow Show,” “The Ed Show” and “The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell,” all while supervising NBC News’ Specials coverage.

The Kal and Lucille Rudman Institute for Entertainment Studies and the Penonni Honors College will host Griffin for a free and open-to-the-public discussion on the future of MSNBC and its ratings war with rival cable news networks on Tuesday, Feb. 25 at 6:30 p.m. in Bossone Hall’s Mitchell Auditorium (3140 Market St., Philadelphia). This event is part of the Rudman Institute’s 2014 Great Works Symposium.

An outspoken, charismatic and often controversial speaker, Griffin has been with MSNBC since its launch in July 1996, when he produced “Internight,” hosted by Tom Brokaw, Katie Couric, Bryant Gumbel, Bob Costas and Bill Moyers featuring newsmakers, artists and authors. Griffin also produced “The Big Show with Keith Olbermann” from 1997-98. Prior to becoming an executive producer at MSNBC, Griffin was the senior broadcast producer of “NBC Nightly News,” where he oversaw domestic stories on a daily basis. Griffin traveled extensively with anchor Tom Brokaw on major breaking news events to Somalia, Moscow and the Middle East.

In 1995, Griffin went to Los Angeles to head up NBC News’ coverage of the O.J. Simpson Trial. Prior to that, he was the American Close-Up segment producer for “Nightly News” beginning in 1991. From 1988-1991, Griffin was a writer/producer for “Today,” where he covered stories including the Persian Gulf War, the San Francisco earthquake and the invasion of Panama. This marked Griffin’s return to “Today,” where he worked from 1983-1987 as a writer/producer. Griffin left “Today” in 1987 to join “USA Today: The Television Show” as senior producer until 1988. He began his career at CNN in 1980, where he was a producer for three years.

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