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Submitting New and Revised Program and Course Proposals to the SCAA

Submission Deadlines for 2015-2016 Catalog

(must be at the SCAA Level of the CourseLeaf workflow):

November 24, 2014

  • New Program Proposals, including new programs made up of existing courses
  • New Course Proposals

January 15, 2015

  • Changes to existing programs, including the addition of new courses
  • Renumbering courses
  • Changing the subject rubric of a course due to a program change
  • Changes to the title of a course (both the long and abbreviated title)
  • Changes to the number credits or repeatable/not repeatable for credit
  • Changes to the offering/schedule type (i.e., lecture, lab, etc.)
  • Pre- and Co-requisite changes
  • Restrictions (i.e., Freshmen excluded)
  • Repeatable/non-repeatable for credit changes
  • The primary/default grade, and all additional grading methods are changing
  • Existing courses replacing inactivated courses
  • All course inactivations
  • Changes to the description that do not require a new course proposal to be submitted

Any proposal submitted on or after January 16, 2015 will be processed for the 2016-2017 Academic Year.
For questions regarding submission deadlines, contact: Dr. Amy Giddings, SCAA Chair at giddings@drexel.edu.

What is CourseLeaf?

CourseLeaf is the content management system used to create the university catalog. It is a system for uploading, editing and finalizing changes to a course or program.

Program Proposals

What should I include in terms of justification for a new proposal or proposed change?

Please remember that while we have representatives from all colleges and schools on the SCAA, we are usually not experts in either the content you are proposing nor the particular history and reasons motivating the proposal.  Thus, when you can provide concrete and detailed justifications for your proposal, SCAA is going to be better able to discuss and review your proposal in an informed fashion. When there is need for clarification, we will always reach out to the originating unit, but if you can provide all the necessary information up front, it will expedite our review process.

When I create a new program proposal, do I need to include all of the courses that will be part of the new program?

Yes. Create the Course Proposals in CourseLeaf first so that they can be attached to the new Program Proposal being created. Course Proposals do not need to be approved prior to placing the courses in the Program Proposal. Courses associated with the Program Proposals are easier to review together and track.

How do I find programs that may potentially overlap with my new proposal?

  • To find existing programs, search the current catalog.
  • Contact or visit the websites of relevant academic units that you think might have similar programs.

When I am submitting a new or revised program proposal that includes new courses, how should I proceed?

  • When submitting a new or revised program proposal that includes new courses, the program proposal and the associated course proposals should be submitted simultaneously.  For new programs, both the program proposal and the associated course proposals should be submitted by the new program proposal deadline in order to make the following year’s official catalog.
  • Revised program proposals with new courses should be submitted by the revision submission date.
  • Keep in mind that proposals may be submitted throughout the year. SCAA meets 10 months of every year (October – July).

Course Proposals

When do I need to include a syllabus when submitting a course proposal?

All course proposal submissions require a syllabus, except when pre- or co-requisite and grading method changes are being made.
The syllabus should conform to the guidelines set in the approved syllabus policy.

What is the Learner Centered Syllabus?

The Learner Centered Syllabus is a set of guidelines for the Drexel community to produce effective course syllabi.  SCAA requires that all syllabi submitted as part of a course proposal meet the approved guidelines. See the Drexel University Office of the Provost Syllabus Checklist.

When does a course change become grounds for proposing a new course?

In general, if the course name and/or description are undergoing significant changes, those changes will be reviewed during the Undergraduate and Graduate SCAA Subcommittee meetings. At the time of the review, the committee may deem the change to be a minor update or a significant change. If the change is significant enough to disrupt the course catalog, student records/transcripts, student registration, etc., the course proposal will be returned to the initiating department for inactivation and subsequent creation and submission of a new course proposal.

What do I do if a course number is being changed, but everything else about the course is remaining exactly the same?

This is a two-step process:

  • Inactivate the old/previous course by clicking on the red “Inactivate” button.
  • Submit a new course proposal. You must note in the new proposal that this new course is replacing an old/previous course (indicate the inactivated course). This allows CouresLeaf to identify the courses as an equivalent so students cannot register for both courses and receive credit for both.

What do I do if I just want to rename a course, but the content will remain the same?

Updating the course title, without changing the meaning is acceptable. For example, changing “Adv Business Practice” to “Advanced Business Practices” is acceptable. Changing “Industrial Engineering” to “Civil Engineering” is not acceptable.
A significant change to the course title will require the existing course be inactivated and a new course proposal be created and submitted.

What do I do if I want to change the name and the description of a course?

Significant changes to titles and descriptions usually require the existing course to be inactivated and a new course proposal to be created and submitted.

But what if I’m just updating the title and/or description of a course to reflect how the course is now being taught, or how the course has evolved over time?

This is considered a significant change because the course, as described in the current catalog, no longer reflects what is being taught in the classroom. This course has evolved into a new course and requires a new course proposal to be created and the original course to be inactivated.

What do I do if I want to change the Subject rubric of a course? For example, all CJ (Criminal Justice) courses are changing to CJS (Criminology and Justice Studies).

This is a two-step process:

  • Inactivate the old/previous course rubrics by clicking on the red “Inactivate” button.
  • Submit a new course proposal for the new course rubric. You must note in the new proposal that this new course is replacing an old/previous course (indicate the inactivated course). This allows CouresLeaf to identify the courses as an equivalent so students cannot register for both courses and receive credit for both.

How do I find courses that may potentially overlap with my new proposal?

To find existing courses, search the current catalog.

  • Search the Content Inventory Management section of CourseLeaf to find relevant courses. For example, if creating a new course involving Biomechanics, use the search term *Biomechanics* in the search tool bar. The asterisk (*) wild card character placed both before and after the word “biomechanics” will return a search that includes the word “biomechanics” anywhere in the title instead of the exact title, “Biomechanics.”
  • Contact or visit the websites of relevant academic units that you think might have similar courses.

How do I know when I should obtain a “sign off” from another unit when submitting a course or program proposal?

We request that units submitting a course or program proposal obtain a sign off from another academic unit when one or more of the following occurs:

  • You are adding or removing a prerequisite that comes from another academic unit.
  • You include a course from another academic unit as a required or suggested elective course in a program.
  • You are proposing a course or program that potentially has overlap, due to the name and/or content, with an existing course or program at the university.

A “sign off” can consist of a letter from an appropriate individual at the academic unit (e.g., department chair, curriculum committee chair) or a PDF of an e-mail exchange with the academic unit that clearly states they are fine with the portions of the proposal that impact their unit.

Such “sign-off” documents are to be uploaded into CourseLeaf in the appropriate section of the course or program proposal.

For more information

Additional information, including CourseLeaf documentation as well as a training schedule, can be found at www.drexel.edu/ais/applications/admin/CourseLeaf.