COMMUNICATION

COMMUNICATION

Employ an understanding of audience, purpose and context to communicate effectively in a range of situations using appropriate media

CREATIVE AND CRITICAL THINKING

CREATIVE AND CRITICAL THINKING

Use divergent (e.g., generation of novel ideas, thinking out of the box, brainstorming) and convergent thinking (e.g., critical thinking, evaluation of ideas, quantitative and qualitative analysis, scientific reasoning) to generate novel and relevant ideas, strategies, approaches, or products

ETHICAL REASONING

ETHICAL REASONING

Assess their own ethical values and the social context of ethical problems, recognize ethical issues in a variety of settings, think about how different ethical perspectives might be applied to an ethical problem, and consider the consequences of alternative actions

INFORMATION LITERACY

INFORMATION LITERACY

Possess the skills and knowledge to access, evaluate and use information effectively,
competently, and creatively

SELF-DIRECTED LEARNING

SELF-DIRECTED LEARNING

Establish goals and monitor progress toward them by developing an awareness of the personal, environmental and task-specific factors that affect attainment of the goals

TECHNOLOGY USE

TECHNOLOGY USE

Make appropriate use of technologies to communicate, collaborate, solve problems, make decisions, and conduct research, as well as foster creativity and life-long learning

GLOBAL COMPETENCE

GLOBAL COMPETENCE

Employ an understanding of audience, purpose and context to communicate effectively in a range of situations using appropriate media

LEADERSHIP

LEADERSHIP

Engage in, reflect upon, and demonstrate open mindedness toward all issues of diversity at the local, national and international level

PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE

PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE

Apply knowledge and skills gained from a program of study to the achievement of goals in a work, clinical, or other professional setting

RESEARCH, SCHOLARSHIP, AND CREATIVE EXPRESSION

RESEARCH, SCHOLARSHIP, AND CREATIVE EXPRESSION

Make meaningful contributions in their chosen field, participating in use-inspired (e.g., inspired by and applied to real-world problems) research, scholarship or creative activity as an individual or in a collaborative effort

RESPONSIBLE CITIZENSHIP

RESPONSIBLE CITIZENSHIP

Create and sustain a healthy, engaged, public life

BUILD YOUR FUTURE

BUILD YOUR FUTURE

Continue to develop the goals, values, and aspirations that have guided them through their Drexel education into a foundation for a successful future

Why Can't We Just Communicate?! Event Banner
  • Creative And Critical Thinking Icon

    Creative & Critical Thinking

    December 3rd, 2012

    What does it mean to be Rational?

    Everyone likes to think that he or she is a rational person and that his or her ideas are well grounded in rationality. But we don't often think about what exactly it means to be rational or reasonable, or for our ideas to be characterized that way. First paradoxical observation: to be rational doesn't necessarily mean to be right. Second paradoxical observation: to arrive at a rational position involves taking a risk that one's preconceptions are wrong alongside a commitment to and orientation toward a Truth that may be inherently elusive. In this workshop, we'll discuss and explore the various shades of meaning related to the idea of rationality and the way it is expressed in the Drexel Student Learning Priority associated with "Creative and Critical Thinking."

    Some questions for discussion during our session:

    • "Thinking outside the box,"–Really?
    • How are "convergent," "divergent," and "emergent" thinking related?
    • What does "bias" really mean in relation to rationality?
    • Why is Critical Reasoning PHIL 105 so widely required by various majors?
    • Why do the "arts and sciences" require one another for each to succeed?

    You will leave the session with a more focused understanding of the meaning of "rationality," how creative and critical thinking are designed to help you develop and exercise it, and how working toward these educational goals will enhance your life prospects both in your career and as a human being.

    Date: Monday, December 3, 2012

    Time: 3:30 PM – 5:00 PM

    Location: Leadership Lab – Greenawalt Student Development Center, Conference Room D – Creese Student Center, Lower Level 3210 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA

    Event Catagory: Drexel Student Learning Priorities. This is the third DSLP event from a series of twelve DSLP events. Event offered as a webinar as well.

    Presenter: Dr. Peter Amato, Director, Programs in Philosophy and Associate Teaching Professor of Philosophy

    Refreshments will be served. Promotional materials will be distributed to all students that attend the event.

    Winning Question:

    Compare and contrast “reasoning” and “bias.” What is the relationship between the “cherry picking” phenomenon and bias? Please make sure to provide supporting examples in your answer as well as incorporate the Creative and Critical Thinking definition.

    Winner: Tong Li

  • Creative And Critical Thinking Icon

    Creative & Critical Thinking

    December 2nd, 2013

    Everyone likes to think that he or she is a rational person and that his or her ideas are well grounded in rationality. But we don't often think about what exactly it means to be rational or reasonable, or for our ideas to be characterized that way. First paradoxical observation: to be rational doesn't necessarily mean to be right. Second paradoxical observation: to arrive at a rational position involves taking a risk that one's preconceptions are wrong alongside a commitment to and orientation toward a Truth that may be inherently elusive. In this workshop, we'll discuss and explore the various shades of meaning related to the idea of rationality and the way it is expressed in the Drexel Student Learning Priority associated with "Creative and Critical Thinking."

    Some questions for discussion during our session:

    • Why is it rational to consider "validity" and "truth" as separate issues?
    • How are "convergent," "divergent," and "emergent" thinking related?
    • What does "bias" really mean in relation to rationality?
    • Why do the "arts and sciences" require one another for each to succeed?

    You will leave the session with a more focused understanding of the meaning of "rationality," how creative and critical thinking are designed to help you develop and exercise it, and how working toward these educational goals will enhance your life prospects both in your career and as a human being.

    Date: Monday, December 2, 2013

    Time: 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM

    Location: MacAlister 2019, 3250-60 Chestnut Street Philadelphia PA 19104

    Event Catagory: Drexel Student Learning Priorities. This is the first DSLP event from a series of twelve DSLP events.

    Presenter: Dr. Peter Amato, Director, Programs in Philosophy and Teaching Professor of Philosophy.

    Refreshments will be served. Promotional materials will be distributed to all students that attend the event.

    Winning Question:

    What is the difference between the everyday notion of "bias" and the logically careful meaning associated with critical thinking? Describe and explain what "cherry picking" is and how it results in holding a position that should be regarded as "biased".

    Winner: Mohammad Nozari

    Please email dslp@drexel.edu to find out how to retrieve your award.