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Winter Assessment Workshops

Wednesday, February 11, 2015

9:00–10:30 a.m.
2020 MacAlister Hall
Direct assessment of Program Learning Outcomes and Course Learning Outcomes
Presented by Don McEachron and Ray Lum

Register for this workshop

This workshop will describe the major assessment methods by which faculty and programs can collect data on student performance and curriculum effectiveness. Each method will be briefly described and potential applications will be discussed. Assessment methods will be placed in the greater context of curriculum design and mapping. Several case studies will be examined to illustrate the utility of specific assessment approaches.

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Describe several assessment methods along with their advantages and disadvantages.
  • Explain the differences between direct and indirect assessment.
  • Explain the differences between summative and formative assessment.
  • Choose the appropriate assessment to obtain valid data to evaluate specific student and program outcomes.
  • Apply assessment strategies when undertaking curriculum design or re-design.

Monday, February 16, 2015

9:00–10:00 a.m.
Sky View Room, 6th Floor, MacAlister Hall
Assessing the DSLP’s in Your Courses
Presented by Diane DePew

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The Drexel Student Learning Priorities (DSLPs) include six core intellectual and practical skill areas and 6 experiential and applied learning areas of competency. While these are program-specific learning outcomes, are these competencies in your course? Should they be? Join us for a discussion of when and how to integrate the DSLPs into your course.

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Revisit the DSLP definitions.
  • Identify which DSLPs are appropriate learning outcomes for their course(s).
  • Create ways to assess for these competencies in their course(s).

Thursday, February 26, 2015

3:00–4:00 p.m.
Sky View Room, 6th Floor, MacAlister Hall
Using the AACU VALUE Rubrics in Assessment
Presented by Deb Frank

Register for this workshop

This workshop is designed to introduce participants to the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AACU) VALUE rubrics which are available for use in assessment programs. Rubrics are available to measure Intellectual and Practical Skills (inquiry and analysis, critical thinking, creative thinking, written communication, oral communication, reading, quantitative literacy, information literacy, teamwork & problem solving; Personal and Social Responsibility (Civic engagement, intercultural knowledge and competence, ethical reasoning, foundations and skills for lifelong learning, global learning; and Integrative and Applied Learning (integrative learning).

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the VALUE rubrics.
  • Access the VALUE rubrics for use in their assessment programs.
  • Draft an assessment for a Program Level Outcome (PLO) or Course Level Outcome (CLO) using one of the VALUE rubrics.

Wednesday, March 4, 2015

10:00–11:00 a.m.
Sky View Room, 6th Floor, MacAlister Hall
Reflective Analysis for Teaching and Learning
Presented by Don McEachron and Karen Nulton

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At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Situate reflective writing in the broader context of teaching and learning
  • Identify when and how reflective writing can further learning goals
  • Create short reflective writing situations for their classes
  • Describe reflective writing practices used by colleagues in the sciences and humanities

Thursday, March 5, 2015

3:00–4:00 p.m.
Sky View Room, 6th Floor, MacAlister Hall
Portfolios for Evaluation and Self-Assessment
Presented by Karen Nulton and Irvin Peckham

Register for this workshop

In this workshop, we will explore the use of student ePortfolios as an alternative grading practice, allowing both faculty and students to reduce anxiety and focus primarily on learning rather than grades. Portfolios are submitted at mid-quarter and at the end of the semester as demonstrations of student participation and what they have learned. The portfolios also become an opportunity for students to analyze and reflect on their work and for faculty to reflect through students' self-analyses on their own teaching practices.

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Describe how student ePortfolios can be used as an alternative grading practice.
  • Describe the advantages of using ePortfolios as an alternative to traditional grading.

Please contact Stephen DiPietro, Associate Vice Provost, sld343@drexel.edu, with any questions.