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13th Kaczmarczik Lecture



"Time and Einstein in the 21st Century: The Coolest Stuff in the Universe"


William D. Phillips
NIST and University of Maryland
1997 Nobel Laureate


Thursday, February 7, 2008
3:30 p.m.

Main Building Auditorium
3141 Chestnut Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104



13th Kaz Lecture Poster

At the beginning of the 20th century, Einstein published three revolutionary ideas that changed forever how we view Nature. At the beginning of the 21st century Einstein's thinking is shaping one of the key scientific and technological wonders of contemporary life: atomic clocks, the best timekeepers ever made. Such super-accurate clocks are essential to industry, commerce, and science; they are the heart of the Global Positioning System (GPS), which guides cars, airplanes, and hikers to their destinations. Today, atomic clocks are still being improved, using Einstein's ideas to cool the atoms to incredibly low temperatures. Atomic gases reach temperatures less than a billionth of a degree above Absolute Zero, without solidifying. Such atoms enable clocks to be accurate to better than a second in 60 million years, while both using and testing some of Einstein's strangest predictions.



Willliam Phillips

Geoffrey W. Marcy is a professor of astronomy at the University of California, Berkeley and an adjunct professor of physics and astronomy at San Francisco State University. He is also the director of Berkeley's "Center for Integrative Planetary Science," a research unit that studies the formation, geophysics, chemistry and evolution of planets. Marcy's research focuses on the detection of extrasolar planets and brown dwarfs. His team discovered the majority of the 250 known planets around other stars, including the first multiple-planet system, the first Saturn-mass planets, and the first Neptune-mass planet. His goal is to discover the first earth-like planets and to find other planetary systems like our own solar system. Marcy is the recipient of numerous awards, including the prestigious Shaw Prize in 2005, Discovery Magazine's Space Scientist of the Year in 2003, the NASA Medal for Exceptional Scientific Achievement, the Carl Sagan Award, the Beatrice Tinsley Prize, and the Henry Draper Medal from the National Academy of Sciences. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Sciences.


High School Open House Program:

12:30 - 1:00 p.m.  Main Building Auditorium

1:00 - 3:00 p.m.   Department of Physics Open House

Brief presentations on Biophysics, Astrophysics, Computational Physics, Condensed Matter, Nonlinear Dynamics, Particle Physics, etc. An excellent opportunity for high school students to visit our laboratories and meet in person with our internationally recognized researchers.

3:00 - 3:30 p.m.     Reception


About the Kaczmarczik Lecture

Paul Kaczmarczik began his career as a Professor of Physics at Drexel University in 1953. A key player in building the Physics and Atmospheric Science Department, he made important contributions to teaching at Drexel University during his many years of service. Well-liked by both his colleagues and his students, Professor Kaczmarczik became Professor Emeritus in 1989. The Kaczmarczik Lecture Series was established in 1995 in honor of Professor Kaczmarczik. It brings to Drexel outstanding scientists to present lectures on topics at the cutting edge of Physics research.


Parking

Visitors may use the Drexel Parking Garage (Lot G) by using the self serve pay by space system. Pay in the lobby at the kiosk just after parking vehicle, by entering the parking space number and selecting from the kiosk's menu prompts. For details, see the parking garage location (and map) and the directions to the University City Main Campus.

Looking forward to seeing you on campus!


For more information:
215.895.2708
kaczlectures@physics.drexel.edu