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In the words of Sidney Brenner (Nobel laureate, 2002), biochemistry "... provides the only experimental basis for causal understanding of biological mechanisms."*

The Biochemistry (BIOC) program at Drexel University College of Medicine is committed to training students to explore the biological mechanisms that control the functions of living organisms. Students in our program work at the interface between chemistry and biology to probe the interactions between biomolecules that direct cellular function. This work is generating fundamental new knowledge about disease pathogenesis and is informing the development of new therapies. Graduates of the program are working as educators and researchers in academia, pharma and biotech.

Biochemistry offers a rigorous and broad-based program of research and coursework leading to the MS or PhD degree. The small size of the program allows us to provide a communal and supportive environment that promotes the free exchange of ideas and methodologies, in which all of members of the community are invested in one another's success. A diverse and dynamic array of faculty mentors participates in the program, representing research areas that include protein structure/function analysis, inhibitor and drug discovery, mechanistic enzymology, cell signaling, virus-host interactions and cancer biology. The theme of molecular and structural mechanisms represents a common thread running through all research programs, regardless of the specific biological focus.

Neha Akella, PhD candidate

Biochemistry Program News

Neha Akella, a PhD candidate in the Biochemistry program, has received the Graduate Student Association Travel Award to attend the March 2016 Keystone Symposium: Stem Cells and Cancer in Breckenridge, Colorado to present her research, "Tumor-initiating activity of breast cancer cells is regulated by O-GlcNAc transferase." She is doing thesis work in laboratory of Mauricio Reginato, PhD, associate professor in the Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology.

* Trends in Biochemical Sciences 25: 584 (2000)

In the Media

"New Protein Structure Holds Answers to PKU"
Pulse (Summer 2016)


How to apply to the Biochemistry program

 
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