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Department of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine Research

The investigational activities of the department are focused on translational research. Our investigators have utilized molecular approaches to identify a sensitive and specific marker for prostate cancer that is being used to develop a urine test for that disease. This general approach can be applied to the detection of a wide variety of other cancers and may also serve as the foundation for therapeutic interventions.

Other investigators are examining the link between viral infection and brain tumors; the effects of proton-pump inhibitors in patients with peptic ulcer disease and gastroesophageal reflux; the biological consequences of cardiovascular prosthetic devices; and prediction of lymphometastasis in breast cancer.

Since our department is central to the collection of patient-derived biological material, a key activity for fostering translational research has been the establishment of an IRB-approved Tissue Procurement Facility, which distributes specimens from patients who consent to allow a portion of their diagnostic sample to be used for biomedical research.

A primary goal of the department is to effectively utilize information from patient-derived biological specimens to advance patient care, education and investigation that will lead to new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. Central to fulfilling this goal is the development of resources in patho-bioinformatics and the analysis of gene expression in pathologic specimens. The department's active involvement in the development of those cutting-edge technologies will advance the understanding of disease processes and directly lead to improved patient care.

The Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine has ongoing research in the following areas:

  • New test for prostate cancer
  • The effects of proton-pump inhibitors in patients with peptic ulcer disease and gastro-esophageal reflux
  • Biological consequences of cardiovascular prosthetic
  • Link between viral infections and brain tumors
  • Prediction of lymphometastasis in breast cancer using IHC markers

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Lab bench with glass beakers and flasks.