Search

More New Courses for Winter

October 30, 2013 — Looking for new courses this winter? Examine the world of comics, graphic novels and memoirs; learn about technology’s role in psychology; or explore the philosophical ideas of the European Enlightenment in these new courses!

Biology

Bioinformatics I (BIO 331.001)

This class focuses on DNA sequence analysis, training students to identify the function and structure of genomes and how to characterize their evolution. Students will gain skills in basic programming, database navigation, and in several relevant software packages used in genome studies. Such skills are used routinely in the realms of medicine (e.g. personalized medicine) and basic biological research. A hands-on, computational focus will give students a brief glimpse into how modern biologists perform research through data mining. No prior programming or advanced computational skills are required.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Jacob Russell, PhD, is open to all students above the freshman level and will meet Mondays and Wednesdays 3:30pm – 4:50pm. Location TBD.

English

Comics and Graphic Novels (ENGL 323.002)

This course will orient students to critical strategies for reading comic books, graphic novels, graphic memoir and other art forms that juxtapose images and text in deliberate sequence. Students will examine comics as a form of writing while bringing approaches to visual culture into conversation with textual analysis. Featured texts include “Fun Home” by Alison Bechdel, “Superman: Red Son” by Mark Millar, “Understanding Comics” by Scott McCloud, and “Aya” by Marguerite Abouet.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by André Carrington, PhD, is open to all students who have passed ENGL 103 (or ENGL 105) and will meet Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, 12:00pm – 12:50pm. Location TBD. 

Critical Race Theory in Law & Literature (ENGL 395.002/PHIL 481.001)

This course deals with works from the era of the Civil Rights Movement to the present in which scholars and activists have criticized long-standing conventions of social thought about race and racism. By reading legal, philosophical, scientific and literary texts, students will explore how political and cultural institutions inform the production and interpretation of American, African-American, Latin, Asian-American, Native American and white identities. Among the authors whose work students will study in the course are Richard Wright, Patricia Williams, Charles Mills, and Adrian Piper.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by André Carrington, PhD, is open to all students who have passed ENGL 103 (or ENGL 105) or earned an A in ENGL 102, and it will meet Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, 9:00am – 9:50am. Location TBD. Registration for PHIL 481 is open to students with at least two 200-level PHIL courses.

Psychology

Technology and Psychology (PSY 480.004)

This course will introduce students to a variety of technologies that play an important role in the field of psychology. The course will primarily focus on virtual reality and neuroimaging technologies, review current research and clinical applications and discuss the strengths and weakness of these methodologies.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Maria Schultheis, PhD, is open to psychology majors above the freshman level and will meet Tuesdays and Thursday from 2:00pm to 3:20pm. Location TBD.

Special Topic: Psychology of Stress & Coping (PSY 480.002)

The course will cover the genetics, neurobiology and psychology of stress, its impact on psychopathology and medical illness, as well as psychological factors that enhance resilience to and recovery from stress. Stress management and effective coping strategies will also be discussed and demonstrated.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Arthur M. Nezu, PhD, ABPP, is open to all students above the freshman level and will meet on Tuesday evenings from 6:30pm to 9:20 pm. Location TBD.

Special Topic: Law and Psychology (PSY 480.001)

Law and Psychology will provide students with the definition and scope of the field, and an overview of the important questions, relevant research approaches and applications. Unlike Forensic Psychology, which focuses on the applications of clinical psychology to law and legal decision-making, the broader course of Law and Psychology will include the contributions of social, developmental and cognitive psychology as well.  Important topics addressed in this course will include criminal and juvenile offending; the psychology of police; the process between arrest, trial and incarceration; eyewitness identification; confessions; psychological evaluations in criminal and civil law; jury selection and decision-making; the psychology of victims of crime and violence; punishment and sentencing; and juvenile and adult corrections.

Students will develop an understanding of the nature, scope and basic methods used in law and psychology.  They will be able to further understand how this area is guided both by the methods and knowledge from the field of psychology, and applicable standards and procedures from the law.  The course will draw heavily on examples, both vignettes from the book and cases that are in the media as the course is being taught.  Finally, students will learn how this information might be useful to individuals in a variety of professions, and to informed citizens.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Kirk Heilbrun, PhD, is open to all students who have taken Psychology 101, and will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays from 2:00pm to 3:20pm.

Special Topic: Judgment & Decision Making (PSY 480.005)

Everyday life consists of an uninterrupted sequence of choices. Many of these choices seem inconsequential, and most occur without conscious thought or deliberation. Some choices, however, have consequences that can last for a lifetime. How does the brain actually make decisions, whether big or small? Are humans rational decision-makers?

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Chris Sims, PhD, is open to all students who have taken Psychology 101, or by permission of the instructor. The course will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays, 3:30pm to 4:50pm. Location: TBD.

Philosophy

Seminar: Rationalism and Empiricism: (PHIL 431.001)

This course offers an in-depth look at the philosophical ideas of the European Enlightenment as influenced by the science and politics of the 17th and 18th centuries.  Special attention will be given to ideas concerning the rise of the modern state as represented in the social contract theories of Thomas Hobbes, John Locke and David Hume, and the relevance of these ideas for our time.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Carol Mele, PhD, is open to students with at least two 200-level philosophy courses, and will meet Wednesdays and Fridays from 3:30 to 4:50pm, Location TBD. Prerequisites may be waived for interested students. Contact Peter Amato, PhD, for more information at peterama@drexel.edu.

Critical Race Theory in Law and Literature (PHIL 481.001 / ENGL 395.002)

This course deals with works from the era of the Civil Rights Movement to the present in which scholars and activists have criticized long-standing conventions of social thought about race and racism. By reading legal, philosophical, scientific and literary texts, students will explore the ways in which "race thinking" shapes American identities and institutions. Among the authors whose work we will study in the course are Richard Wright, Patricia Williams, Charles Mills and Adrian Piper.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by André Carrington, PhD, is open to all students with at least two 200-level PHIL courses, or students who have passed ENGL 103 (or ENGL 105) or earned an A in ENGL 102. The course will meet Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, 9:00am – 9:50am. Location TBD.

Seminar: Arendt & Eichmann (PHIL 485.001)

This course will begin with Hannah Arendt’s controversial report on Israel’s trial of Eichmann, a member of the Nazi SS who was responsible for the mass deportation of Jews to ghettos and concentrations camps throughout Europe. The course will be supplemented by essays from Arendt’s later writings in which she reflects upon the philosophical issues raised by the Eichmann trial; excerpts from some of her earlier writings, as means to understanding the philosophical concerns that informed her report of the Eichmann trial; and various movies about the trial and Nazi Germany. Some of the questions the course will address include: What is evil; is it banal, and what does that mean? What is thinking, and how does it affect doing or avoiding evil? Is there a “right to have rights;” what might that mean? Students may apply these questions to any genocides, dirty wars or “refugee problems” of the 20th or 21st century; and they may do further research into what role international courts should play in trying those who commit “crimes against humanity.”

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Amy Bush, PhD, is open to students above the pre-junior level with at least two 200-level philosophy courses, and will meet Mondays from 2:00pm to 4:50, Location TBD. Prerequisites may be waived for interested students. Contact Peter Amato, PhD for more information at peterama@drexel.edu.

 

Check out even more new courses for the Winter Term » 


###