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FALL 2014-15 Special Topic Courses

Below you will find descriptions of the courses we are offering this upcoming FALL 14-15:

On-Campus Courses:

Course

Course Title Day Time Instructor

ANTH 212-001

Native American Culture

MWF

1000-1050

Storniolo

ANTH 212-002

Reconstruction History after Genocide-Meets with JUDA 215-001

TR

0930-1050

Peltz

ANTH 380-001

Arch of the Aegean

MWF

1530-1650

Powell

COM 360-001

International Communication

R

1830-2120

Nikolaev

COM 400-002

Nonprofit Communication

R

1830-2020

Souder

SOC 312-001 The Politics of Life TR 1230-1350 Ebeling


Online Courses (Restricted to Online Students only):

Course Course Title Day Time Instructor
COM 400-900 Risk Communication ONLINE ONLINE-DEL Kelley

 


ANTH 212-001

Native American Culture

ANTH 212-001 (11465)

Fall 2014-15

MWF 1000-1050

Instructor: Dr. Judith Storniolo

 

This course presents the American Indian experience since the arrival of European fishermen, traders, and settlers from the indigenous perspective. All articles, books, websites, and films used in the class have been written or produced by native peoples. The contact phenomena past and present are presented through the native lens and pen, providing students with a portal into the lives of individuals and groups that see and describe the world from a different perspective. Students come to understand indigenous values and perspectives of events. Through the indigenous narratives, films, art, and music students learn from those with a much closer association and understanding of indigenous identity, tradition, and worldview. Course materials cover contemporary struggles for political sovereignty, cultural and linguistic continuity, religious freedom, land and water rights, health and education, music, art, literature, and day-to-day survival on reservations.

 

 

ANTH 212-002

Reconstruction History After Genocide

ANTH 212-002 (15775)

Meets with JUDA 215-001 (15774)

Fall 2014-15

TR 0930-1050

Instructor: Dr. Rakhmiel Peltz

 

The framework for this course is the concept of educational restitution to peoples who are victims of genocide. After a discussion of concepts related to the world’s responsibility to maintain its cultures and to provide help to victims of genocide and mass violence in recovering their history, the class will compare educational efforts to document life before the destruction in locations, such as Rwanda, the former Yugoslavia, and among Native American groups. The class will then focus on the politics of teaching Jews about the largest community of Jews in the world up until World War II that was destroyed by the Nazis during the Holocaust, Polish Jewry. Students will evaluate different sources that describe Jewish life that was destroyed in one case study city, Lublin, Poland.

 

 

ANTH 380-001

Arch of the Aegean

ANTH 380-001 (15756)

Fall 2014-15

MWF 1500-1550

Instructor: Dr. Robert Powell

 

Many of the core social and political influences that make life here in the United States what it is today originated 5000 years ago in Egypt and Mesopotamia. In ancient times, a totally new way of life traversed from the “Cradle of Civilization”, through the islands of the Eastern Mediterranean, into the region of Europe that would become Classical Greece, and from there to Macedonia and Rome.

The course begins its archaeological exploration in prehistoric Egypt and Mesopotamia, before “the birth of civilization”. With the stage set, you’ll witness the formations of the first “States”, and then track the movement of the phenomenon of The State through the Eastern Mediterranean, where it is ‘mixed’ with proto-European culture on the Aegean island of Crete. From there, it’s on to Europe.

Throughout, we explore a line of thought that questions whether this was the advantage for humankind that most of us see as a given.

 

 

COM 360-001

International Communication

COM 360-001 (12314)

Fall 2014

R 1830-2120

Instructor: Dr. Alexander Nikolaev

 

The course will explain the significance of international communication in the contemporary world. The range of issues that we will consider varies from the historical context and theoretical concepts to economic and structural aspects of international communication. In each area, however, we will be trying to identify the key developments and large issues at stake, and to build a framework for analysis, rather than merely acquire information. A great deal of attention will be paid to the role of culture in international communication and especially such elements of culture as language, education, religion, family, gender-related issues, social power structure, ethics and etiquette.

 

 

COM 400-002

Nonprofit Communication

COM 400-002 (12474)

Fall 2014-15

R 1830-2120

Instructor: Dr. Lawrence Souder

 

All nonprofit organizations must develop and maintain effective communication strategies in order to survive in a competitive economy. Nonprofits have unique needs and limitations in their long-term goals and short-term operations that relate to communication. This course introduces students to the ways nonprofits communicate with both their constituents and their benefactors and the ways researchers have examined these practices. Students will explore these two perspectives on nonprofit communication through a combination of scholarly readings, dialogues with local representatives in the nonprofit sector, and direct contact and work for a local nonprofit organization (as coordinated by Drexel Edits, a center for the support of nonprofit communication). This course articulates with the content and goals of other courses in the Department of Culture and Communication, specifically COM280 (Public Relations), COM220 (Qualitative Research Methods), COM282 (Public Relations Writing), COM286 (Public Relations Strategies and Tactics), COM675 (Grant Writing for the Arts and Humanities), and COM680 (Public Relations Writing and Strategies).

Objectives

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • define nonprofit
  • explain how nonprofits are governed (responsible citizenship*)
  • identify the various stakeholders in a nonprofit’s community (ethical reasoning*)
  • describe the various communication genres used by nonprofits (communication*)
  • assess the communication needs of a nonprofit (self-directed learning*)
  • write and edit samples of communication genres used by a nonprofit (technology use*)

*Relevance to Drexel Student Learning Priorities

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SOC 312-001

The Politics of Life

SOC 312-001 (15764)

Fall 2014-15

TR 1230-1350

Instructor: Dr. Mary Ebeling

 

In this course we will explore the sociological implications of advancements that have been made in genetic engineering, biotechnologies and other areas of biomedical research. Starting with earlier examples of "power over life" from the 18th and 19th centuries, we will explore themes, dilemmas and complications embedded in the scientific control over life. Topics to be explored include biopower and biocapital, eugenics, race and class, stewardship and bioengineering, new reproductive technologies and reproductive choice, among much, much more. Consideration to feminist, queer and critical race theories will frame much of our discussion in class. This is a reading and discussion-intense course.

 

 

COM 400-900

Risk Commuication

COM 400-900 (13816)

Fall 14-15

ONLINE

Instructor: Dr. Frank Kelley

 

This course is designed for the serious communication student who wants to make a career in corporate communications. To prove that point read your local and national newspapers; look at local and national TV News. Risk precedes crisis.

Risk communication involves people in all walks of life—parents, children, legislative representatives, regulators, scientists, farmers, industrialists, factory workers, and writers. It is part of the science of risk assessment and the process of risk management.

Risk communication encompasses many types of messages and processes. It is the poster warning food workers to handle food safely to prevent the spread of Escherichia coli bacteria. It is the emergency response worker rallying a community to evacuate in the middle of the rising flood. It is the community representatives sitting down with industry to discuss the siting and operation of a hazardous waste incinerator.

Having some credentials in this area may just be the tipping point for you to get the first job or that promotion.