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Summer 2014 Special Topic Courses

Below you will find descriptions of the courses we are offering this Summer in the Department of Culture and Communication:

On-Campus Courses:

Course

Course Title Day Time Instructor

ANTH 380-001

Anthropology of Food

MWF

1300-1350

Storniolo

COM 380-001

Photography for Journalists

TR

1100-1220

Stegeman

COM 380-002

Urban Farming Communities–Meets with SOC 380-001

T

1530-1650

Greenwell 

COM 380-940

Writing on Work Identity

ONLINE

ONLINE-DAY

Schlichting-Artur

COM 400-001

Muslims in the Media

TR

1400-1520

Choudhary



Online Courses (Restricted to Online Students only):

 Course Course Title Day Time Instructor
SOC 380-900 Social Mapping ONLINE ONLINE-DEL Parrotto
SOC 380-901 MetaVisioning ONLINE ONLINE-DEL Parrotto
COM 400-900 Social Media ONLINE ONLINE-DEL Evangelista

 


ANTH 380-001

Anthropology of Food

ANTH 380-001 (42859)

Summer 13-14

MWF 1300-1350

Instructor: Dr. Judith Storniolo

 

“Tell me what you eat and I’ll tell you who you are.”  Brillat-Savarin (2009). 

Food impacts almost every part of human existence.  Anthropologists study our relationship with food and how we use it to bond with others, celebrate or mourn, and keep our bodies going. In this course we will explore food from the first fire-cooked meal through domestication, consumption, preparation, genetic modification, and the privatization of food production today.  We will also view food through cultural eyes by learning how people throughout the world produce, consume, and enjoy food. We will reflect upon how our personal and cultural choices concerning food impact many aspects of our lives including our mental and physical health, self- image, social life, and identity.

 

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COM 380-001

Photography for Journalists

COM 380-001 (42374)  

Summer 13-14

TR 1100-1220

Instructor: Professor Al Stegeman  

In this hands-on course, we’ll explore the art of telling news stories with images.  This course is for anyone with a passing interest in either journalism or photojournalism, and it should be of particular interest to budding journalists looking to expand their newsgathering skills to include photography.   Prior photo experience and/or coursework will be helpful, but not necessary.  Assignments will include taking effective accompanying photographs for news stories, as well as producing stand-alone images which can convey a story without words.  Students will need to provide their own digital cameras—these can be either compact “point-and-shoot” cameras or digital SLRs.

 

 

COM 380-002

Urban Farming Communities

COM 380-002 (42665)

Meets with SOC 380-001 (42666)

Summer 13-14

T 1530-1650

Instructor: Professor Danie Greenwell

 

This class will explore urban farming from a community organizing perspective. Class will take place on an urban farm in West Philadelphia, where students will learn practical skills for planting and maintaining an urban green space as well as organizing communities and planning crop distribution. Students will be in class for 1.5 hours every week and expected to volunteer on an urban farm for 3 hours per week.

Tuesdays 3:30-5pm at The Enterprise Center (volunteer times will vary depending on availability of slots and location)

 

 

COM 380-940


Writing on Work Identity

COM 380-940 (42664)

Summer 13-14

ONLINE

Instructor: Dr. Simone Schlichting-Artur

 

Writing on Work Identity is an online course developed for students to take during their co-op cycle and for those who have not yet entered the work force. The goal of the course is for students to begin to build their social and work identities in order to better understand how power and culture influence the workplace environment and how it is negotiated. The first phase of the course will focus on the “self”; the student will participate in self-categorization and evaluation of personal expectations in regard to their co-op and future professional life. The second phase will consist of an analysis of power dynamics at the workplace, focusing on the “other” rather than the “self.” Students will observe their surroundings and use assigned readings to better understand how workplace relations are interpreted and function through the lenses of race, culture, and gender. The final phase is a synthesis of the “self” and the “other,” in which the student will combine knowledge acquired from the readings and personal experiences in order to address issues facing the modern workplace, as well as reflect on their individual work identity.

 

 

COM 400-001

 

Muslims in the Media

COM 400-001 (40935) 

Summer 13-14

TR 1400-1520

Instructor: Professor Wajeeha Choudhary

 

When you hear the word Muslim, what comes to mind? 9/11, Osama bin Laden, and terrorism? You probably don’t think of rapper Lupe Fiasco, Thomas Jefferson or the development of coffee as a major world commodity.  What are the historical and political reasons for why it seems easier to associate Muslims with terrorism than coffee, algebra, or the gleaming skyscrapers of the Gulf States? In COM 400 class “Muslims in the Media," we will explore this question of how Muslims are imagined and represented in mainstream media today.  In this course we will begin with an examination of how racial minorities have historically been represented in the media and then we will transition more specifically to discussions of Muslims represented in print and online news, film, television, and photography. Finally, we’ll end with how Muslims themselves are responding to these media representations (be prepared to watch a film about some funny Muslims!). This class will primarily focus on the United States, but we won’t limit ourselves to the American context. Discussions can include media cultures in Muslim-majority countries and other Muslim diasporas. 

A sneak preview of class assignments: for the final project, students will thoroughly analyze and critique a piece of communication that, in some way, represents Muslims. Throughout the course, we will build the proper toolkit for you to conduct this analysis. In addition to the final project, students will turn in three short papers throughout the term that reflect on and respond to class readings. Students will also present and lead a class discussion on one class reading of their choice.

For more information, contact the course instructor: Wajeeha Choudhary, Department of Culture and Communication, wac39@drexel.edu

 

 

SOC 380-900

Social Mapping

SOC 380-900 (42931)

Summer 13-14

ONLINE

Instructor: Professor Anthony Parrotto

 

Social Mapping leads you through a process of exploring great issues of our time, such as Leadership & Followership, Education, Healthcare, Governance, Corruption, Planned vs. Market Economies, The Environment, Overpopulation, Globalization, Poverty, Reason vs. Faith, Terrorism, and Social Lag. To encourage you to rely on your own sensibilities rather than on what others prescribe, the course begins with an emphasis on the need to transcend illusions, prejudices, self-limiting ideologies, and other forms of conceptual imprisonment that diminish us as individuals, separate us into warring camps, and perpetuate the endless cycle of misadventures, destruction, and despair that humankind endures. Each week you will be asked to write your thoughts and feelings about one or two of the great issues. The sum of your opinions becomes your Social Map.  To learn about what others have written about each great issue, you will have access to a Database of Social Maps. For more information about the course, go to: www.mazeway.org

 

 

SOC 380-901

MetaVisioning

SOC 380-901 (42932) 

Summer 13-14

ONLINE

Instructor: Professor Anthony Parrotto   

 

MetaVisioning is a collaborative process dedicated to resolving a coherent, moral, and universal vision of how humankind can move forward together creatively, joyfully, and peacefully. To be prepared to meet this extraordinary challenge, we are encouraged to place faith in our own moral compass, rather than submit thoughtlessly to the moral certainty of traditional programs. Also, to rely on science to distinguish truth from what is false, but appreciate that creativity and new truth involve more than the reductive process of science. Through thoughtful inquiry, open-ended dialogue, and self-reflection, we will discover if we can become aware of our own conditionings, and examine how they affect the relationship with ourselves, others, our planet, and how we encounter diverse worldviews. As such, the MetaVisioning process helps: (a) liberate us from illusions, prejudices, self-limiting ideologies, and other forms of conceptual imprisonment; (b) unite us rather than divide us into warring camps; (c) and spawn love, compassion, charity, and hope rather than hatred, indifference, greed, and despair. Learn more about the course at: www.mazeway.org.



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COM 400-900

Social Media

COM 400-900 (41855)

 Summer 13-14

ONLINE

Instructor: Dr. Paul Evangelista 

 

Social Media provide an integrated communication system for connecting, collaborating and building community. Through lectures, discussions, original research and experience-based structured experiences, students examine how these functions may be applied in personal, professional contexts.

Course Purpose and Statement of Expected Learning

Social Media and Communication provides a vehicle for understanding how social media applications extend and enhance human interaction. Students will learn how Social Network platforms, Wikis and Blogs have evolved and their implications for interpersonal, small group, organizational and mass communication. Students will demonstrate specific skills and competencies as a result of the course, including the following:

1. Demonstrated knowledge of the primary functions of Social Media as they apply to personal and professional communication

2. Application of knowledge and skills to identify major trends in the development of Social Media platforms.

3. Analysis of the suitability of individual Social Media platforms for specific communication applications and contexts.

4. Application of knowledge and skills for creating online profiles that can be used with specific Social Media platforms and adapt them for use in personal and professional communication contexts.

5. Analysis of trends in the development, deployment and application

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