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New Courses for Summer

April 2, 2014 —  

Communication

Urban Farming Communities (COMM/SOC 380)

This class will explore urban farming from a community organizing perspective. Class will take place on an urban farm in West Philadelphia where students will learn practical skills for planting and maintaining an urban green space, as well as organizing communities and planning crop distribution. Students will be in class for 1.5 hours every week and expected to volunteer on an urban farm for 3 hours per week.

This community-based hybrid course, taught by Danie Greenwell, will meet Tuesdays from 5 – 6:20 p.m. at the Enterprise Center. Additional volunteer time TBD by student.


English

Lust & Lies Over Tea (ENGL 310.002)

This is not the Brit Lit of your fathers! Contemporary Brit Lit is funny, multicultural and often salacious. In this class, students will encounter tales of transgendered love, interracial love, heartbreaks, betrayals and isolation from Black British women writers and examine the question of what it means to be "British" in the 21st century. This course will feature the works (stories and films) of Jackie Kay, Meera Syal, Ravinder Randhawa, Andrea Levy and Gurinder Chadha.

This 3.0 credit lecture course, taught by Sheila Sandapen, PhD, will meet Wednesdays, 6 – 8:50 p.m. Location TBD.


History

The Great War, 1914-1918 (HIST 235.001)*

This course examines the global causes, conduct and consequences of World War I, which fundamentally altered our century's political, social, economic and cultural institutions.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Eric Brose, PhD, will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays, 2 – 3:20 p.m. Location TBD.

*As a companion to this course, Brose will host an 11-day seminar tour to England, France and Belgium over the 2014 fall break for students to experience the First World War centenary. This travel course weaves together visits to many war museums, several battlefield tours, battle reenactments, a WWI stage play, three classic WWI films, as well as traditional lectures about the soldiers who fought in these battles.  This 3.0 - 4.0 credit travel course is also open to students who have taken HIST 235, HIST 259, HIST 267 in past terms.  Students who choose to participate in the travel component must pay additional fees to cover the cost of the trip.  Applications are available at the Study Abroad website.

The Twentieth Century World I (HIST 267.001)*

This course examines the movements, institutions and personalities in the major regions of the world, from 1890 through 1939.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Eric Brose, PhD, will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays, 3:30 – 4:50 p.m. Location TBD.

*As a companion to this course, Brose will host an 11-day seminar tour to England, France and Belgium over the 2014 fall break for students to experience the First World War centenary.  This travel course weaves together visits to many war museums, several battlefield tours, battle reenactments, a WWI stage play, three classic WWI films, as well as traditional lectures about the soldiers who fought in these battles.  This 3.0 - 4.0 credit travel course is also open to students who have taken HIST 235, HIST 259, HIST 267 in past terms.  Students who choose to participate in the travel component must pay additional fees to cover the cost of the trip.  Applications are available at the Study Abroad website.


Philosophy

Philosophy of Sport (PHIL 210.001)

What distinguishes sport from other cultural pursuits? Are all sports games, and must all sport be considered play? What are the relationships between the values embedded in sporting cultures and those of the larger society? And what can we learn about ourselves from our cultural obsession with major collegiate and professional sport?

Philosophy of Sport examines these and other stimulating questions, aiming to provide robust but flexible theoretical frameworks for understanding the nature, meaning and values associated with modern sport. We will link our discussions to new emergences in the realm of digital play, explore evolving understandings of fandom, and attempt to come to grips with the various ethical and political issues that dominate headlines in the world of sport.

This 3.0 credit course is open to all students above the sophomore level and meets Mondays and Wednesdays, 3:30-4:50 p.m. Location TBD. Restriction on sophomores may be waived for interested students. For more information contact the instructor Mr. Bryan Sacks, at bksacks@gmail.com.

Disability and Philosophy (PHIL 475.001)

The field of disability studies emerged out of the international disability rights movement, which organized to resist and draw attention to disability not as a medical condition but as a form of social oppression. Starting from the insight that disability is a mode of oppression, disability studies investigates the constitution, experience and function of disability within society. In its pursuit of this goal, disability studies has posed new questions and developed new ways of considering some of the most enduring philosophical problems such as personal and social identity, social constructionism, human nature, human rights and embodiment.

This course has three goals. The first of these is to serve as an introduction to disability studies and its relation to the international disability rights movement. The second is to consider the writings of some philosophers who have written on topics relevant to the study of disability. The third is to consider some philosophical challenges that have been raised by disability studies. Some of the questions that we will consider in this class are: What is disability? What is the relationship between disability and identity? What are norms and how did the distinction between the normal and the abnormal come about? What can disability teach us about human rights?

This 3.0 credit course is open to all students above the sophomore level and meets Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, 1 – 1:50 p.m. Location TBD. Restriction on sophomores may be waived for interested students. For more information contact the instructor, Eric Fleming, at eric.f.fleming@drexel.edu.

Ethics and the Law (PHIL 475.002)

The life of a legal professional can be fraught with questions of ethics and professional responsibility. The very nature of the trust placed in members of the legal profession by clients, the courts and society at large can lead to a number of questions, not only about what someone in the legal profession can do, but also, more importantly, what someone in the legal profession should do. This course will explore many of the ethical issues and dilemmas faced by those working within the legal field. Students will address many topics stemming from the tension between the legal professional’s duty to his/her client and his/her individual duty to the legal profession and society at large.

This 3.0 credit course is open to all students above the sophomore level and meets Wednesdays, 6 – 8:50 p.m. Location TBD. Restriction on sophomores may be waived for interested students. For more information contact the instructor Michael Vitlip, JD, (Drexel Pre-Law Advisor), at vitlip@drexel.edu.


Political Science

ST: International Perspective on Population & Development (PSCI 472.001)

This course provides a survey of issues related to the idea of development from demographic, social, economic and historical perspectives. Issues to be discussed include the concepts of human progress and social and economic development as viewed by different schools of thought, as well as the hypothesized relationships and links between economic growth, social development, population growth and health progress. The concept of standard of living, human development index, the demographic transition and the gender aspects of development will be also discussed. The goal of the course is to provide a general introduction to the major issues involved in the concepts of social and economic development.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Jose Tapia, PhD, will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays, 11 a.m. to 12:20 p.m. Location TBD.


Writing

Hospice Journaling (WRIT 304.130): Community-Based Hybrid

Many people are scared of death. However, the last days of someone’s life are really a time to celebrate that life. In this class, students will work in teams to create a video documentary and “Life Journal” book to help a hospice patient pass down their life experiences to their family and loved ones.  Students will reinforce that what they’ve done really matters, while recognizing the significance of their own personal experiences and existence.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Kenneth Bingham, will meet Thursdays from 3:30 – 5:00 p.m. Community classroom TBD by student and partner. Course requirements: PA criminal background check and Tuberculosis test.

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