Search

Drexel Philosophy, CoMAD General Education electives available for Spring 2013

March 18, 2013 — If you are still looking for a General Education or Free elective for the Spring term, please see the following list of options that were sent to us from the Philosophy Department. Students may be eligible to waive selected prerequisites for some classes. For further information, contact Peter Amato, director of the Philosophy program: pa34@drexel.edu.

In addition to the PHIL courses above, there are also some interesting courses offered by Westphal College of Media Arts and Design. Click here for the full list.

PHIL 391 Philosophy of Religion TR 3:30-4:50 - Studies various aspects of religious belief and experience from a philosophical standpoint, considering issues such as the definition and existence of God, the nature and course of evil, and the relationship between faith and reason in a religious life.

PHIL 385 Philosophy of Law TR 2:00-3:20 - This course addresses philosophical issues in the law. Topics include the meaning of "law," the nature and logic of legal (in contrast to moral) concepts and principles, and competing conceptions of law (Natural Law, Positivism, Realism, Rights-Based, etc.). Authors may include Plato, Mill, Rawls, Hart, Dworkin and others.

PHIL 241 Social & Political Philosophy TR 9:30-10:50 - Studies theories about human social and political life that bear on philosophical issues such as the nature and scope of justice, the legitimacy of states, and the relationship between democracy, civil rights, and civil disobedience.

PHIL 221 - Epistemology TR 2:00-3:20 - Studies theories about knowledge that bear upon philosophical issues concerned with the nature and status of knowledge claims as expressed in concepts like belief, truth, and justification.

PHIL241 Social and Political Philosophy TR 9:30 to 10:50 - Dr. Nathan Hanna - Studies theories about human social and political life that bear on philosophical issues such as the nature and scope of justice, the legitimacy of states, and the relationship between democracy, civil rights, and civil disobedience. For further information contact the instructor nathan.t.hanna@drexel.edu.

PHIL322 Ethics of Human Enhancement TR 17:00 to 18:20 - Dr. Stacey Ake - Is human enhancement ethical? Is it ethical to go from human to superhuman? What would it be like to be “enhanced”? in this class we will discuss developments in healthcare with the potential not only to treat disease, but also to improve human performance and cosmetically change the human body, thereby creating ethical considerations about the nature of health and disease and the proper scope and goals of healthcare. For further information contact the instructor sea29@drexel.edu.

PHIL330 Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice TR 15:30 to 16:50 - Dr. Andrew Smith - Studies ethical issues in the policies and practices of criminal justice, and theories that bear upon issues such as the relationship of law to justice, the definition of crime, the use of deception and coercion in law enforcement, and the purposes and varieties of criminal punishment. For further information contact the instructor afs52@drexel.edu.

PHIL385 Philosophy of Law TR 14:00 to 15:20 - Dr. Andrew Smith - This course focuses on fundamental topics associated with jurisprudence, many of which figure prominently in moral and political theory more generally. We will address three broad themes: We will begin by assessing questions of analytic jurisprudence, by which the nature of law and legal interpretation is assessed. Chief among these questions are: “What is law?” “What is a legal system?” “What is the relationship between law and justice/morality?” We then take up critical theories of law, which challenge the prevailing Anglo-American understanding of the nature and function of law and adjudication. We will assess such issues as whether law should be understood and determined by the actual practices of courts, whether law and legal systems perpetuate social hierarchies. Lastly, we take up issues of normative jurisprudence: assessments not simply of what law is but of what it should be. We will evaluate under what conditions we should obey the law; how we should understand our rights before the law; questions associated with the scope of liberty, privacy, and freedom of expression; the legality of torture; justifications for punishment; and questions concerning tort law. For further information contact the instructor afs52@drexel.edu.

PHIL391 Philosophy of Religion TR 15:30 to 16:50 - Dr. Marilyn Piety - The modern worldview, which tries to reduce human experience to purely mechanistic terms, leaves little room for religion or spirituality more generally. This has led many to reject the modern worldview in favor of much older and, in many instances, simplistic worldviews. This reflects what some have referred to as the spiritual crisis of modernity. Fortunately, religion is far more complex than its various fundamentalist instantiations would lead one to believe. There are many sophisticated interpretations of religion that can answer the contemporary spiritual crisis without requiring a rejection of modernity. We will explore some of these more promising and challenging interpretations. Our objective will be to come to a better and richer understanding of both religion in particular and the spiritual dimension of human experience in general. This course will teach you that the effort to understand existence and your place in it is inherently rewarding. It will expose you to the wealth of sophisticated and challenging versions of religion and spirituality that have preoccupied philosophers and theologians throughout history. Ultimately, the course will help you to appreciate and respect the spiritual dimension of human experience and thus help you along the path to full humanity. For further information contact the instructor mgpiety@drexel.edu.

PHIL461 Seminar in Contemporary Philosophy M 14:00 to 16:50 - Dr. Peter Amato – Martin Heidegger’s thought is at the crossing of many of the paths of Contemporary Philosophy. We’ll see some key Heidegger texts, then explore the work of his students Herbert Marcuse and Hans-Georg Gadamer, who set off in different directions. Reading and Writing Intensive. Honors students may be eligible to waive selected prerequisites for this class. For further information contact the instructor pa34@drexel.edu.

PHIL475-001 Theoretical Approaches to Science and Technology T 18:30 to 21:20 - Dr. Flavia Padovani. This course will address the issues surrounding three crucially interconnected themes in the history and philosophy of science: the notion of theory, the nature and epistemology of experiments, and the related theme of instrumentation, measurement and coordination. We will analyze these issues from a variety of angles, especially with regard to the debates between realism and social constructivism. Students will develop a nuanced and rich notion of how scientific theories are formed and tested and what these terms and concepts mean in practical terms. They will gain deepened insight into some of the complexities involved in scientific practices and explore the differences in how they are understood by different philosophical approaches. For further information contact Peter Amato, director of the Philosophy Program, at pa34@drexel.edu.

PHIL475-002 Applied Aesthetics W 15:00 to 17:50 - Dr. Hana Beth Iverson - Public art is a living entity composed not only of physical objects but also achieved through meaningful experiences. In the last few decades, public art has moved to the center of academic and public debate. This class will look at all forms of public art and experience including memorials, public architecture, alternative museums, art as pilgrimage and the art of entertainment. Significantly, it will look at recent trends in participatory experience; how and in what way public participation can be generated. A final class project will be developed for the lobby area of the new URBN Center, incorporating the big screen display. This is an interdisciplinary class that benefits from the various backgrounds of the students. We will examine the issues of “publics” and “art” through a blend of aesthetics, architecture, media, mobility and public life. For further information contact Peter Amato, director of the Philosophy Program, at pa34@drexel.edu.

###